Tips To Help You Care For Your Home Septic System

When your home is set up on its own septic system, it is essentially a mini waste treatment facility all within your home's property. However, you need to care for your waste treatment system to keep it working its best and remaining as problem-free as possible. Here are some recommendations to help you take care of your home septic system.

Understand Your Tank Capacity

One of the first rules of owning a septic system is to understand how much waste your system can handle based on its size and the size of your household. Your system's capacity, which is ultimately the capacity of your tank, will only be able to handle a maximum amount of waste before it will become overfilled with solids and begin to seep it out into the drain field. Because the drain field is only meant to collect and disperse wastewater, any solids that get into the drain field will clog it up and cause problems in your waste until it backs into your home.

If you are not sure of the tank's size, you can ask your septic professional to check it for its capacity when they come to service and pump the tank. Otherwise if you are buying a home with a septic system, be sure to ask the seller its size. 

Most septic tanks and households will require you to get your tank pumped every three to five years. But this can vary based on how much laundry you wash, how often you run the dishwasher, and how much showering and bathing goes on inside the home.

Arrange For Regular Professional Pumping

Once you have determined your tank capacity, it is up to you to arrange for a septic professional to handle the work. Be sure you can locate the tank access hatch within your yard, as it may be covered with vegetation or a shallow covering of soil, especially if it has been many years since the last servicing. Your septic professional will need clear access into the yard and to the tank access to pump the waste from the tank.

While your septic tank pumping professional is at your home, they can check the system for any problems and inspect the tank. If your septic tank contains any mechanized parts, such as a float switch or a pump, they will also be able to make sure these components are still functioning properly.


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